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Censorship

In our earlier discussion, we talked about if we have a case, whether we always want to get it into the media. I believe that this is almost always beneficial, but the trick is how. Before you do that, you have to understand the media landscape. Hong Kong has a very peculiar media environment...
A media analyst sheds light on the concessions made by Western media companies in exchange for entry into the Chinese market. Translated by Dušanka Miščević Just as the world has favored the China market because of the country’s rapid economic growth, the foreign news media have also attached great...
Diverse set of users Works in your country Sustainable network and software development Open design Decentralized architecture Keeps you safe from websites too Does not promise to magically encrypt the entire Internet Fast Easy to get the software and updates Does not promo
Many Internet users are aware that they ought to look for a padlock icon in their web browsers when doing something important online. Some users understand that the padlock is supposed to indicate that their communications are “secure”—confidential and in some sense authentic.
On January 12, 2010, Google stunned the world with its dramatic announcement that it was reconsidering its business in China in the wake of debilitating cyber-attacks, and furthermore that the company was no longer willing to continue operating a censored search engine in China, Google.cn, launched...
March 24, 2010 1 China Update Let us start with an update on Google’s situation in China. We launched Google.cn, our Chinese search engine, in January 2006 in the belief that the benefits of increased access to information for people in China and a more open Internet outweighed our discomfort in...
Translation by HRIC In August 2007, the Financial Times reported that at least five Chinese Internet entrepreneurs had introduced websites similar to Twitter. This was barely one-and-a-half years after the original Twitter was introduced on March 21, 2006. At present, if a website model has found...
Translation by Wen Huang The Internet has created room for the birth and development of civil society in totalitarian countries. In the past two years, social networking sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, have developed at an amazing speed in non-democratic countries. They have become the...
It has been nearly two years since China’s first access to information statute took effect on May 1, 2008.
Translation by HRIC China’s Internet censorship system is divided into the blocking of information from outside China and the censoring of information from within. More has been written about the blocking of information from outside China, which is accomplished chiefly by the Great Firewall (GFW).

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